Thursday, June 23, 2005

Edgewater Parrots Cheer Pro-Parrot Resolution

monk parakeet
I made an expedition out to Edgewater, New Jersey, last Sunday to get a sense of how the wild parrots are doing. One month ago, on May 16th, PSE&G tour down many of their nests, but the parrots haven't left Edgewater at all. In fact, I counted five nests that have been substantially rebuilt. One is constantly amazed and inspired by these wild parrots' persistence and industriousness.

There was another very good piece of news reported by the birds' zealous protector, Alison Evans-Fragale, who last Monday successfully persuaded the Mayor and Council of the Borough of Edgewater to pass a resolution aimed at protecting the Borough’s wild Quaker Parrots. Let's give a cheer for Alison - you can visit her site at EdgewaterParrots.com

Now for the new pictures from Edgewater, courtesy of your Enquiring Bird Photographer.


Two Canada Geese wait patiently at Edgewater's Community Center for news of whether Edgewater's Pro-Parrot resolution has passed.


Meanwhile, a larger group of Canada Geese threatens a walkout (actually a swimout) unless Edgewater passes a pro-Goose resolution.


We attempted to speak to this parrot but he refused to either identify himself or express an opinion about the resolution. In fact, he told us to get off his property, which we did.


Other parrots were more forthcoming. "The resolution is a good idea and it makes me very proud to live in Jersey," this bird said. His name is Carlos and he lives on River Road.


Several wild parrots were more cautious about the resolution's potential. "A resolution is fine," said a bird named Delores, also of River Road, "but what we really need is for New Jersey to change its ridiculous, antiquated laws. Do I look like a dangerous, invasive species to you? Now don't give me the wrong answer, pal!" she joked.


On Monday night, after Edgewater's Pro-Parrot resolution passed, news spread quickly among the parrots.


Birds flew out of the nests in the "Big W" tree" every few seconds to give each member of Edgewater's large wild parrot community the good news.


A number of parrots gathered in Edgewater's Veteran's Field to send a raucous cheer Alison's way. "It's the least we can do for her," said this one, who didn't give his name, but probably lives on River Road.

Saturday, June 11, 2005

Canada Geese vs. Wooden Dogs


Over the weekend, a mysterious pack of wooden dogs was observed in Edgewater's Veteran's Field. They evidently were placed there to scare the geese whose presence on the field angers some residents. I decided to camp out and observe whether the phony dogs had any effect on the geese.


"Whoa!" - said the first goose to walk up from the beach. "Prepare to do battle, sinister-looking canine!"


"Wait a minute," said the goose. "There's something funny about that dog."


"Hey," the goose noted. "I've never seen a dog attached to the ground by a stainless steel pole before. That's one dog that definitely won't hunt!"


"It's OK, you guys," said the lead goose. "Don't pay that phony canine any mind. Advance ho!"


And so the geese marched on, believing that they, as much as any self-respecting Edgewater resident, have a God-given right to use the field.

Tuesday, June 07, 2005

The Whitestone Parrots

A correspondent in Queens reports that she witnessed 16 to 20 wild monk parrots in Frances Lewis Park in 1996. At its peak, the Park accomodated 4 to 5 nests built in tall trees, but two nests were destroyed when these trees, which were partially dead, collapsed. The parrots adapted to this circumstance by leaving the park and building nests in trees, especially pines, situated in backyards throughout the neighborhood. As of 2005, the birds have been sited flying around the neighborhood but the nests, being on private property, are difficult to inspect and survey.